NEW RETAIL STORE

mossycreeknatural2016a

It’s been a whole year since we embarked this new venture.  I am pleased to tell you that this NEW store changed our whole business model.  It has been an interesting ride so far.  We began our small business out of our kitchen in 2009, with in a year we were looking for a place to make soap full-time. Then two years after that we were looking for a larger space, then found our current home Downtown Perry Georgia.  What a stinking cute place?! Last year we secured a spot in the main shopping district of our downtown area and open up a retail only store called Mossy Creek Natural.

Yes, I admit this is my dream place.  I have been dreaming about a store like this since 2009.  I am here to tell you that we shoestring our way to Carroll Street!

Here are some pictures of our new store at 915 Carroll Street, Perry, Georgia.

I am now the proud owner of two successful stores.  We employ about 5 people to help keep it a success. We feel blessed to call Middle Georgia our home and we want to share with you a very cool video of our local area within Houston County, Ga.

We are still offering private instruction and workshops at our studio. We are no longer offering our hands on Soapmaking 101 classes but we have chosen to offer them in a E-HANDOUT version which can be found here:  SOAPMAKING 101 E-Handout Plus Video access

We would like to extend an invitation for you to join us for our next Weekend Soapmaking Workshop in September 2016.  We will be offering all our tips and tricks to starting your own soap business the easy way.  Find out how to run a retail shop.

Good bye for now, very soon we will be offering more videos, posts and tips to making your own soap.

 

OPENING A SOAPMAKING RETAIL SHOP Part 3

Questions to ask your self  BEFORE you get into the RETAIL business

Dreaming Big in the Retail Soapmaking Business

Dreaming Big in the Retail Soapmaking Business

Welcome to part 3 of the Opening a Retail Soapmaking Shop-

So this brings to me to the HARD QUESTIONS that you  need to ask yourself before you get into the RETAIL business.

Are you using the “DREAM” of owning a retail shop to cloud your judgment?  We’ve all been here before— that’s why we got into business in the first place.  We were all dreaming of owning a cool bath and body business like “XZY” down the street and dreamed of how happy you would be once you had it.  But don’t get sold on the “IDEA” of having business, do you research and find out what the day-to-day operations will be like.  It is HARD work and involves a lot of time.

Can you afford it? Do you have enough income to cover overhead just in case?   I had a backup plan that included sales from difference resources just in case I didn’t have  sales for that month. You will need enough to include your rent/lease/utilities/maintenance expenses. Money is scarce and it’s tough getting business credit. Credit cards helped me getting started with the basic start-up costs involved with opening a retail shop. Most of my income coming in my business got rolled back into the business for a few years.  A portion of it continues to get rolled back into the business today.

A few tips: In the beginning a landline phone is not necessary, you don’t need an  internet connection in your new place either or  pay for regularly scheduled picks from UPS and FEDEX.  Save those for later on when your business is established and making money.  Use the “Square”  for all your credit card transactions and your business cell phone as your regular line.

Do you have unlimited time to invest in your retail shop?  Post your  hours and  be present/open during those times.

Competition-  This should be included in your feasibility studies and it will give you a good opportunity to scout out the competition.  I would inquire discreetly how well they are doing. You could learn from them and adjust your ideas before you get started. You could also ask your small business rep to see if they know them; maybe they could give you insight on what to expect.

Conduct your own market feasibility study to see if your idea will be supported in your community.  {A feasibility study evaluates your project’s potential for success as it examines the marketability of your product}

Your SBA office should be able to help you gather the data to support it. Find out if your “DREAM” idea will bring in the money or send you into financial ruin.

Links for you to check out!

What Is Product Marketability?

31 Days to Build a Creative Business

 

Cosmetic Manufacturer or Drug Lord? Which one are you?

Education goes a long way when it concerns safe cosmetic manufacturing and I am not only talking about the “big guys” but also many small businesses as well.  In our quest to make a fabulous product and our passion to share it’s wonderful benefits we may in fact be selling drugs. Making health claims on your products is a BIG no no unless you have the data and the license from the FDA to make those claims.  The FDA is very adamant about what you can and cannot say with your cosmetics-

http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/ucm074201.htm

“Intended use may be established in a number of ways. The following are some examples: 
  • Claims stated on the product labeling, in advertising, on the Internet, or in other promotional materials.Certain claims may cause a product to be considered a drug, even if the product is marketed as if it were a cosmetic. Such claims establish the product as a drug because the intended use is to treat or prevent disease or otherwise affect the structure or functions of the human body. Some examples are claims that products will restore hair growth, reduce cellulite, treat varicose veins, increase or decrease the production of melanin (pigment) in the skin, or regenerate cells.
  • Consumer perception, which may be established through the product’s reputation. This means asking why the consumer is buying it and what the consumer expects it to do.
  • Ingredients that cause a product to be considered a drug because they have a well-known (to the public and industry) therapeutic use. An example is fluoride in toothpaste.
This principle also holds true for “essential oils.” For example, a fragrance marketed for promoting attractiveness is a cosmetic. But a fragrance marketed with certain “aromatherapy” claims, such as assertions that the scent will help the consumer sleep or quit smoking, meets the definition of a drug because of its intended use. Similarly, a massage oil that is simply intended to lubricate the skin and impart fragrance is a cosmetic, but if the product is intended for a therapeutic use, such as relieving muscle pain, it’s a drug.”
 
Be very careful about making these claims because they do not play when they come knocking on your door. Whether you have stated in your description on your own online website, ETSY or distribute information at your craft shows–seller beware BIG brother is watching you.
So do not become one of these companies:

http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ComplianceEnforcement/WarningLetters/ucm081086.htm

More links you want to know about:

Are you thinking of making a cosmetic and want to stay within the guidelines?  I suggest purchasing this fabulous book–

 http://www.mariegale.com/maries-books/soap-and-cosmetic-labeling-book.html

Marie Gale makes it very easy to wade through these guidelines by providing examples to help you comply and not sell drugs without a license.  I hope you have found this information helpful.